Server Side Javascript

Server-side web frameworks (a.k.a. “web application frameworks”) are software frameworks that make it easier to write, maintain and scale web applications. They provide tools and libraries that simplify common web development tasks, including routing URLs to appropriate handlers, interacting with databases, supporting sessions and user authorization, formatting output (e.g. HTML, JSON, XML), and improving security against web attacks.

The next section provides a bit more detail about how web frameworks can ease web application development. We then explain some of the criteria you can use for choosing a web framework, and then list some of your options.

What can a web framework do for you?

Web frameworks provide tools and libraries to simplify common web development operations. You don’t have to use a server-side web framework, but it is strongly advised — it will make your life a lot easier.

This section discusses some of the functionality that is often provided by web frameworks (not every framework will necessarily provide all of these features!).

Work directly with HTTP requests and responses

As we saw in the last article, web servers and browsers communicate via the HTTP protocol — servers wait for HTTP requests from the browser and then return information in HTTP responses. Web frameworks allow you to write simplified syntax that will generate server-side code to work with these requests and responses. This means that you will have an easier job, interacting with easier, higher-level code rather than lower level networking primitives.

Most sites will provide a number of different resources, accessible through distinct URLs. Handling these all in one function would be hard to maintain, so web frameworks provide simple mechanisms to map URL patterns to specific handler functions. This approach also has benefits in terms of maintenance, because you can change the URL used to deliver a particular feature without having to change the underlying code.

Data can be encoded in an HTTP request in a number of ways. An HTTP GET request to get files or data from the server may encode what data is required in URL parameters or within the URL structure. An HTTP POST request to update a resource on the server will instead include the update information as “POST data” within the body of the request. The HTTP request may also include information about the current session or user in a client-side cookie.

Websites use databases to store information both to be shared with users, and about users. Web frameworks often provide a database layer that abstracts database read, write, query, and delete operations. This abstraction layer is referred to as an Object-Relational Mapper (ORM).

Using an ORM has two benefits:

You can replace the underlying database without necessarily needing to change the code that uses it. This allows developers to optimize for the characteristics of different databases based on their usage.

Basic validation of data can be implemented within the framework. This makes it easier and safer to check that data is stored in the correct type of database field, has the correct format (e.g. an email address), and isn’t malicious in any way (crackers can use certain patterns of code to do bad things such as deleting database records).

Web frameworks often provide templating systems. These allow you to specify the structure of an output document, using placeholders for data that will be added when a page is generated. Templates are often used to create HTML, but can also create other types of document.

Web frameworks often provide a mechanism to make it easy to generate other formats from stored data, including JSON and XML.

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